small yellow flies

Local rivers are settling. Water temperatures are rising into the right zone and with that insects are making a strong appearance and trout are becoming much more active. I’m seeing a lot of the small stoneflies, especially hatches of Yellow Sallies. Here is a recent tie for the faster riffle sections: size 16.

And a tie for slower river sections, size 16.

Pale Morning duns are also starting. Like the Sallies they are light yellow/ cream in color. Some have a slight orange or pale green tint to them. I prefer this hatch as they ride the river surface for a fairly long time before taking flight. Trout can relax and sip on them.

The small fly hatches, unlike the big flies, tend to go on for weeks on end and some for months. They tend to be consistent and dependable. Last year  I fished Pale Duns from late June into late September on one of the local tailwater rivers. That’s reliability!

Catching a large rising trout on a small fly is always a real challenge and quite special when a connection is made and one landed. Here are a few taken on small dries…

One week, one fly, two feet

multipsheds

I just spent a week fishing in my region. Most of the summer I have been a weekend angler. It was nice to be off work and stretch several river days together. I fish better when I have more time. I also tend to stop and take more photos while roaming around searching for trout.

dishill

sheepreel-1

I had one cloud covered rainy day and a strong hatch of tiny olives, and a few larger ones, occurred. The trout were mainly on emergers. I fished a few different dangling fly patterns with some success. The key word is, “some”. That was the easiest day.

foamfly

emerger pattern, foam post for flotation, hook bent out by trout

 

 

bwofish

caught on olive emerger pattern

 

bwoflat

blue winged olive flat

drksideshed

The other days were full sun and therefore much more challenging. A few were calm, most were quite breezy. There were still some bugs around but not a lot. The rises were infrequent with the bright sky. And when they did occur they were real subtle. Just spotting the faint sips was an accomplishment. I often had to listen for signs of surface feeding on the blinding sun glazed flats. Most of the good trout located were hovering in just inches of water. It’s my favorite type of angling. In skinny water you have to be “sneakier than sneaky” in order to fool them. Mistakes are rarely tolerated… few second chances. To make things even more challenging the trout were generally only feeding on tiny stuff. Time flew by. Hours seemed like minutes. Relaxing? No. Engrossing? Yes. Fun? Yes.

anglebow

hills

broadside

2sheds

framed-tree

On another river I used the sun and elevation when possible to my advantage in order to spot fish in the shallows. Then I’d drop down, choose my approach and try to fool them.

mt-snow

snow in the mountains

 

perfectrees

 

murky-fish

All week I casted olives when they were around, and fed beetles and ants to located trout when there was no hatch. While roaming around I found some old sheds; hiked some smooth wind sculpted hills; took pictures of small trees ( prairie bonsai) which always attract attention in the stark terrain; and caught a few wonderful trout. I also met a sheep herder taking a nap in the shade of my Jetta. He’s an old friend. Every year without fail we run into each other riverside.

One week, one fly, two feet…

 

sheep-herder

tailhold

 

murkyside

palm-tree

downstreamclif

dist-river

beetle

beetle pattern

head

 

sheepherd

great Pyrenees herder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

august fins

“August is like the Sunday of summer”

dorsal

We’ve had some clouds, some summer storms, some sun and cool nights and therefore  river temperatures have remained alright even though the water is low. It looks like we might get through August without any angling restrictions. South of the border (Montana) the situation seems quite different.

I’ve been sight fishing small terrestrials and on one river Tricos; one of my favorite hatches. It’s a good time of year as a few trout are rising and the Blue Jays (baseball) are in the hunt for the playoffs. I want to see Jose Bautista hit a late game homer and fling his bat again…the best “take that!” moment in baseball I’ve seen in a long time.

Here are some river images from the past couple of weekends…I struck out several times but did manage to hit a few long ones…

hils

adipose

lrg

 

wide

abby

abby

 

stwide

roundup

round up

 

tail

002

sleep

cuttbow

cuttbow

 

island

trico

double trico